The Most Expensive Guitar Picks In The World

On my search for a great story on guitar picks I stumbled upon a company that claims to make the most expensive plectrums ever. The company is called Starpics Australia and this is an article about the most expensive guitar picks in the world made by this company. You can read what they are made of, what makes them special, how much they cost and where you can buy them.

I first read about these picks on a website called “The Most Expensive Journal” where they talk about these guitar picks and of course I had to know more.

They claim that the most expensive guitar picks are made of meteor stone materials. Pieces of the Gibeon meteorite were used to craft these plectrums. Together with a variety of special metals these picks will cost you about $5000. You can see a picture showing a metal edge around the plectrum. I don’t know what kind of materials they used, but it could be something like silver.

Are they worth it? Well, Starpics claims that these picks will outlast every other pick on the planet and with an average use of 75 guitar picks per year for an average guitar player you can save thousands of dollars and save the environment.

Sounds good right? And they call it the ultimate pick. The sound must be amazing and because of the smooth edge they should give you an incredible tone. They also say that these picks are great for recording because they have very little attack when you hit the strings.

But the most interesting thing is that it saves your strings. This material apparently looks after the quality of your strings. And they say that you will have a 500% improvement on string life! That’s really amazing! Imagine the money you will saving on strings?

I normally use one set of strings on each gig. With these picks I could do five gigs before I have to change my strings. Now all I have to do is buy really expensive guitar strings to make the difference even bigger.

So now you know what the most expensive guitar picks are made of and what makes them so special. Would you buy them? Would I buy these picks? If I had that kind of money to spend I probably would give them a try. But since I don’t have that kind of money I will stick to my plastic little friends. They might kill my strings and the sound will probably be worse, but at least I won’t be totally depressed when I lose them.

 

Source by Martin Seij